Articles on Miscellaneous Bonsai Subjects

Moss Basics

By Will Heath, USA


Moss is a simple type of plant that lacks roots; the plant is anchored by means of threadlike structures called rhizoids. It also lacks stems, and leaves. The name Moss refers to any species of the class Bryopsida that is part of the division Bryophyta. Bryophyta means the first green land plants to develop during the known evolutionary process. Moss is thought to have evolved from very primitive vascular plants. Moss is not known to have given rise to any other kind of plant, an evolutionary dead end of sorts.
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Pest Management

By Carolyn Carver. USA


The information was originally compiled by Carolyn Carver for her own use. It was presented as a seminar at the Bonsai Societies of Florida convention in West Palm Beach in May 1999. Mrs Carver wants to remind all readers that all chemicals should only be applied in strict accordance with recommended rates and only on labeled pests and plants.
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Saikei - Tray Landscape

By Jyoti and Nikunj Parekh, India


Saikei, word consists of two Japanese words, 'Sai' meaning a plant and 'kei' meaning a view or a scene. A harmonious combination of young plants and rugged stones creates a natural scene in Saikei. Pioneering efforts in establishing the new school of Saikei were made by a leading Bonsai artistes and teachers Mr. Toshio Kawamoto and Tom Yamamoto of Japan.
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Unusual Bonsai Species and Styles

By Kev Bailey, United Kingdom


To the newcomer all bonsai are unusual. Anyone with an abiding interest may find that the repetition of working with the same old species, in a limited number of styles, becomes jaded in time.
If we look beyond our indigenous species and traditionally used shrubs and trees, there are thousands of other species that are of great interest. Many of these can be used to create excellent unusual bonsai. They provide a welcome diversion, a talking point and give constant interest.
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Japanese Lanterns

By Kev Bailey, United Kingdom


Lanterns are a classic component of the Japanese garden and a worthwhile addition to the bonsai display area. There are many distinct types, in sizes and styles to suit most tastes. Authentic carved stone lanterns are very expensive due to the craftsmanship involved, the fragility of parts and their weight adding to the shipping costs. Some companies now replicate the originals in resins, reconstituted stone or concrete. Some of these can look quite pleasing but the knowledge that it is a mass-produced lantern may detract for the purist.
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Computers & Bonsai

By Kev Bailey, United Kingdom


So how can the shiny plastic box help? Once you get over the beginners nerves, they are remarkably easy to use. Here are some of the most productive things you can use your computer for, in regard to your bonsai:- We all need a reliable way of recording the progress of our trees. Keeping this information up to date is easy and rapidly accessible on computer. There are some dedicated shareware (cheap and cheerful) programs available, but a wordprocessor or database program (like a card file index) are brilliant for this job.
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Video & Bonsai

By Kev Bailey, United Kingdom


Still photographs are generally accepted to be the best way to record the progress of a tree from initial training to maturity. They also assist in the planning of future changes in the design. Video can be a more appealing method of displaying the advances of your designs. The three dimensional quality of a tree can be much better represented. Place it on a turntable and slowly revolve it or simply walk around the tree.
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Trees Lost - Lessons Learned

By Kev Bailey, United Kingdom


I've heard variations of a statement used by bonsai masters a few times. It is that "you're not a true bonsai buff until you have lost a treasured tree". Well, if that was the sole criteria, I should be approaching master status! Although it must be said that, with more than a thousand trees somewhere between seedling and "finished" bonsai, it's not really surprising that, occasionally, I lose one or two.
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