Articles on Propagation

Airlayered Yamadori Hawthorn

By Peter Evans, United Kingdom


I had been growing bonsai for a few years,but the more I read the more I realised that my trees lacked a certain quality. Age was what was missing. An article in Bonsai Today #2 about airlayering inspired me to do something about curing my problem. Airlayering is a means of propagating new plants from woody material or, as the article stated, improving the root system of your trees. I thought of expanding on this idea by airlayering a branch of an old tree to make my new tree. The branch I eventually found belonged to a very old Hawthorn that was growing in a quarry.
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Plant Propagation - Asexual Propagation

By The Arizona Master Gardener Manual, Arizona Cooperative Extension


Asexual propagation, as mentioned earlier, is the best way to maintain some species, particularly an individual that best represents that species. Clones are groups of plants that are identical to their one parent and that can only be propagated asexually. The Bartlett pear (1770) and the Delicious apple (1870) are two examples of clones that have been asexually propagated for many years.
The major methods of asexual propagation are cuttings, layering, division, and budding grafting.
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Plant Propagation - Asexual Propagation (Part Two)

By The Arizona Master Gardener Manual, Arizona Cooperative Extension


Grafting and budding are methods of asexual plant propagation that join plant parts so they will grow as one plant. These techniques are used to propagate cultivars that will not root well as cuttings or whose own root systems are inadequate. One or more new cultivars can be added to existing fruit and nut trees by grafting or budding.
The portion of the cultivar that is to be propagated is called the scion. It consists of a piece of shoot with dormant buds that will produce the stem and branches. The rootstock, or stock, provides the new plantís root system and sometimes the lower part of the stem. The cambium is a layer of cells located between the wood and bark of a stem from which new bark and wood cells originate.
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Air Layering For Difficult-To-Root Plants

By Everett E. Janne, USA
Extension Landscape Horticulturist
Texas Cooperative Extension


The procedure was to wound the stem or branch of a plant and enclose the wounded stem with moist sphagnum moss or similar rooting medium until roots develop from the wounded area. Success was dependent upon the ability of the propagator to keep the rooting medium moist until the roots were formed and large enough to support the new plant. Only since the development of polyethylene film has air layering become a practical method of propagation for the home gardener and amateur horticulturist.
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Layering

By Kev Bailey, United Kingdom


One of the most reliable methods for propagating material for bonsai is by layering. It is almost foolproof. Layers can be taken from many plants that are difficult from cuttings. You can even layer from a mature bonsai that you wish to redesign. This gives you two or more plants that are "instant bonsai". Another advantage is that a dramatic flare of many fine, radially spread roots is produced. This allows you to choose which roots will be allowed to develop into the ideal nebari, by eliminating any that are unnecessary or badly placed.
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Propagation - Cuttings

By Kev Bailey, United Kingdom


Taking cuttings produces genetically identical plants. It is therefore of great benefit for the propagation of species that easily hybridise or varieties that revert. It's also faster than raising plants from seed, especially when larger, semi-hardwood, hardwood or trunk cuttings can be rooted.
Success is almost guaranteed, so long as you follow the basic procedures at the correct time of year.Sometimes the rules can be broken with almost equal success, so don't feel too tied to them.
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Trees From Seed - Bonsai The Slowest Way

By Kev Bailey, United Kingdom


Still photographs are generally accepted to be the best way to record the progress of a tree from initial training to maturity. They also assist in the planning of future changes in the design. Video can be a more appealing method of displaying the advances of your designs. The three dimensional quality of a tree can be much better represented. Place it on a turntable and slowly revolve it or simply walk around the tree.
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