Species Specific Articles

Junipers: Part Four

By Randy Brooks, USA


Warning: This article has not yet been rated and may contain depictions of violence, crawly things and yucky stuff. It may not be suitable for the embarrassingly squeamish. Parental supervision is not advised, kids tend to like bugs.
"You've got mites." No, not you personally. That's what they're saying about the juniper that you've brought in to a club meeting. Of course, you're in immediate denial as the declarer calls out for a sheet of paper to prove your malady. However, what is even scarier than the possibility of mites is the enigma of where all those sheets of paper appear from. Say the word 'mites' at any bonsai club meeting and a slip will materialize from thin air.
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Junipers: Part Three

By Randy Brooks, USA


If you're new to junipers, and you've been following along, you should have a few nursery-grown plants in your possession, and you're ready to snip, clip, and create your first juniper masterpiece. If you've got a few junipers already that are possibly showing some stress, not growing quite the way you think they should, or are on their last photosynthetic gasps, hopefully you will find an answer here.
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The Pine

By Morten Albek, Denmark


Pinus is the Latin name, and Matsu is the Japanese name for one of the most beloved species for bonsai, the Pine tree.
Pines are undoable powerful, and aesthetic a very valuable tree. At the same time the Pine is also one of the most difficult specimens to succeed as a bonsai.
Even though the Pine, Matsu, is dry tolerant and copes with both heavy freezing temperatures and hot summers, it is still not one of the easiest bonsais to keep.
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Junipers: Part Two

By Randy Brooks, USA


So, you've seen them in the bonsai rags, or you saw a few at the state convention or local show. Maybe, a member brought a specimen in to a club meeting. Whatever the case, the juniper bug has taken hold, and you've got to have one in your collection. You've seen how magnificent they can be, and you understand why, if there is bonsai royalty, junipers wear one of the crowns. Your desire is not that of the neophyte who acquires one with glued-on gravel and places it on top of his television so he can find inspiration or ‘feel transported' when he gazes at it during Survivor commercials. No, your cravings run just a little bit deeper.
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Junipers: Part One

By Randy Brooks, USA


Identity; for one thing. Your friends know you by your name, and certainly a stranger would have no other way of knowing who you are - not being familiar with you by appearance. And while you may be able to deduce cultural, racial, and ancestral characteristics of a person from their name, the names we choose for ourselves and our offspring are more art than science and probably convey more about the personality of one's parents than anything substantial about us as a life form. About the only thing you can normally deduce about a person from their name is their sex, although some - like Randy - can be ambiguous.
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Buttonwood

By Maggie Beyer, USA


The first topic deals with the day-to-day location of buttonwood bonsai. In the Pinellas Park area which is sunny and windy, the most suitable exposures seem to be on the southeast and west sides of a house. Button wood bonsai are kept on movable mesh shelves two feet by four feet by two inches. The mesh of one inch squares allows maximum air circulation. When temperatures at the day-to-day location reaches 50-55 F, the trees are moved into a southwest facing screen porch.
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Conocarpus Erectus (Florida Buttonwood)

By Mary Madison, USA; and Jean Waldberg, USA


The Florida buttonwood, Conocarpus erectus, is unique in its struggle in that it is not indigenous to South Florida and has had to survive not only frost, floods and violent winds, but storm tides and man, too! It is also unique in that it has received aid in its struggle from alligators!
Florida is of recent geological origin, and the primary habitat of Conocarpus erectus, the Everglades and Florida Keys, is thought to be only about 5,000 years old. Current thinking is that the plant species did not evolve in the area but in the Caribbean Basin and was transported to Florida by tropical storms.
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Willow Leaf Fig / Ficus salicifolia

By Jim Smith, USA


The willow-leaf fig is known in bonsai as Ficus Salicifolia and Ficus Neriifolia none of witch is scientific names. The true Ficus salicifolia is a native of South Africa and has a willow shaped leaf similar to our willow-leaf fig but the leaf is larger and the tree does not grow as compact. I purchased my first Ficus Salicifolia in 1975 as a small potted plant from a local nursery in Vero Beach Florida.
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Portulacaria afra, the Elephant's Food or Spekboom: a monograph

By Robert J Baran, USA


"Portulacaria afra, the Elephant's Food or Spekboom: a monograph which contains some of the areas of both knowledge and ignorance pertaining to this plant"
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